2020 Factory Supercross Bikes—Alex Martin’s Suzuki RM-Z250

JGRMX/Yoshimura/Suzuki Factory Racing’s 2020 250F Supercross racebike.

Alex Martin is JGRMX/Yoshimura/Suzuki Factory Racing’s one and only rider in the Western Regional 250SX Class this season.
Alex Martin is JGRMX/Yoshimura/Suzuki Factory Racing’s one and only rider in the Western Regional 250SX Class this season.Spencer Owens

After switching to the JGRMX/Yoshimura/Suzuki Factory Racing team and racing in the Eastern Regional 250SX Class Championship last year, Alex Martin returns to the Suzuki factory racing effort for 2020, but is contesting the Western Regional 250SX Class this season. At the age of 30, the Minnesota-born racer is a veteran of the 250 class and is teamed up with longtime factory Supercross and motocross wrench Lee “Leeroy” McCollum. The day before the Anaheim 1 season opener of the 2020 Monster Energy AMA Supercross series, we asked Leeroy to give us some insight on his rider’s 2020 Suzuki RM-Z250 racebike.

Spinning the wrenches for Martin is Lee McCollum, who is a veteran Supercross and motocross mechanic and has worked with the likes of Travis Pastrana, James Stewart, and Phil Nicoletti.
Spinning the wrenches for Martin is Lee McCollum, who is a veteran Supercross and motocross mechanic and has worked with the likes of Travis Pastrana, James Stewart, and Phil Nicoletti.Spencer Owens

Martin’s RM-Z250 began life as a stock motorcycle before being modified at the JGR race shop in Huntersville, North Carolina. Although Martin weighs only 140 pounds, squeezing every ounce of power out of an engine is essential in the 250 class regardless of rider weight, which JGR handles itself with some Suzuki factory parts from Japan along with a number of aftermarket components.

“We use some Japanese factory [engine] parts, but also do a lot of work at JGR,” McCollum explained. “The motor work [and] some chassis stuff [such as] the linkage is done in-house.”

JGR handles the engine work themselves with some Suzuki factory parts from Japan and a number of aftermarket components. Note the hole in the engine hanger, which is done to change the flex characteristics of the chassis.
JGR handles the engine work themselves with some Suzuki factory parts from Japan and a number of aftermarket components. Note the hole in the engine hanger, which is done to change the flex characteristics of the chassis.Spencer Owens

Inside the JGRMX cylinder head assembly are a JE piston, Web Cam camshafts, and Xceldyne valvetrain components. The Yoshimura RS-12 exhaust system looks similar to an off-the-shelf model, but features a special titanium header pipe with an added resonance chamber along with a bung welded on it to accommodate an O2 sensor, which is utilized for data collection.

The Yoshimura RS-12 exhaust system features a special titanium header pipe with an added resonance chamber along with a bung welded on it to accommodate an O2 sensor, which is utilized for data collection.
The Yoshimura RS-12 exhaust system features a special titanium header pipe with an added resonance chamber along with a bung welded on it to accommodate an O2 sensor, which is utilized for data collection.Spencer Owens

Hinson Racing provides the clutch components inside the engine along with a Billetproof clutch cover and Billetproof ignition cover. As far as on the fly tuning capability, Martin has access to two different maps via the GET map switch on the right side of the handlebar. CV4 provides the radiator hoses and a JGR case saver is added to prevent any damage in the case of a chain failure.

Martin has access to two different maps via the GET map switch on the right side of the handlebar.
Martin has access to two different maps via the GET map switch on the right side of the handlebar.Spencer Owens

The RM-Z250’s stock KYB AOS (Air-Oil Separate) fork and KYB shock are swapped out for Showa A-Kit components, which JGR handles the tuning of mostly on its own.

“We do the [suspension] settings in-house at JGR,” McCollum said. “We work with Showa technicians too, but most of the time we’re doing it ourselves now. We also use a different linkage that we make ourselves, so we can either use a shorter or longer pullrod depending on what we want to try to achieve.”

Showa A-Kit suspension components are used and JGR handles the tuning of them mostly on their own with occasional assistance from Showa technicians.
Showa A-Kit suspension components are used and JGR handles the tuning of them mostly on their own with occasional assistance from Showa technicians.Spencer Owens

Like most factory bikes, Martin’s machine is outfitted with several aftermarket parts for function, added strength, rider preference, and appearance. Some of those items include a Guts Racing seat cover, Works Connection holeshot device, ARC clutch perch and clutch lever, and a JGRMX carbon fiber skid plate.

Protecting the underside of the bike is a JGRMX carbon fiber skid plate. You can buy the same one for your 2019–2020 Suzuki RM-Z250 for $299.95.
Protecting the underside of the bike is a JGRMX carbon fiber skid plate. You can buy the same one for your 2019–2020 Suzuki RM-Z250 for $299.95.Spencer Owens

McCollum told us the wheels are factory. JGRMX/Yoshimura/Suzuki is the only factory team in the Supercross pits that relies on Pirelli tires, and Martin opts for a wider-than-stock size in the rear.

Martin runs a Pirelli soft rear tire, which is wider than the stock size at 120/80-19.
Martin runs a Pirelli soft rear tire, which is wider than the stock size at 120/80-19.Spencer Owens

“He uses a mid-hard front and a soft rear,” McCollum said. “The rear is a 120[/80-19], and that could change at any moment through the weekend.”

ProTaper provides the handlebars for the team. Due to his shorter stature, Martin prefers a Ricky Carmichael bend, which is low and flat.
ProTaper provides the handlebars for the team. Due to his shorter stature, Martin prefers a Ricky Carmichael bend, which is low and flat.Spencer Owens

ProTaper provides the sprockets, grips, and handlebar. Being that Martin stands at 5-foot-4, the team makes a few modifications to accommodate his shorter stature.

“Because Alex is sort of a smaller guy, his footpegs are 20mm higher than the standard footpeg and [both] the shifter and rear brake pedal have to be raised because of that,” McCollum said. “There’s only so much room to raise the rear brake pedal with the standard configuration, so we have to make a taller tip at the end of the brake pedal. He runs a Ricky Carmichael [bend] handlebar, which is pretty low and flat. He uses the old, traditional bar with a crossbar, whereas some of the other riders use an open bar. The bar risers are fairly low too.”