New Shoei VFX-EVO Helmet

First impression of Shoei’s new motocross and off-road protection

New Shoei VFX-EVO Helmet
The VFX-EVO features the all-new M.E.D.S. safety system. According to Shoei it reduces rotational forces to the rider’s head during an impact.Brian Szumski

The VFX-EVO is Shoei's latest and greatest helmet. Although receiving many updates from ventilation to the all-new M.E.D.S. (Motion Energy Distribution System), the EVO still has many characteristics of the previous VFX-W model, such as the sharp and sleek looks for which Shoei is known.

When we got the new helmet, I noticed it has great looks and design. When you receive the helmet, you must install the visor and nose/mouth guard. Instantly I found the nose/mouth guard fit perfectly, and the visor had a locking spot for the screw to slip into and keep the visor in place, which are two nice features.

New Shoei VFX-EVO Helmet
Left: Shoei's M.E.D.S. uses a second piece of EPS in the top of the helmet that is, according to Shoei, "Anchored by a larger center column, the inner layer of the dual-­layer system swings during impact, allowing its three strategically designed perimeter columns to absorb the energy."
Right: Here's another view of the M.E.D.S. piece as well as a view of the ventilation channels.
Illustration provided by Shoei

The first time I tried on the helmet I noticed its great fit and comfort. I felt the padding was soft yet still offered a tight fit which added to comfort. The first thing I noticed while taking the EVO on the track for the first time was how well it vented. Shoei gave much thought into ventilation performance, and it's a noticeable difference compared to the VFX-W model. When I would put on other helmets they would feel instantly cold on the helmet liner and cheek pads from sweat during earlier motos. Due to the EVO's 16 intake and exhaust vent ports, every time I strapped on the new helmet, I wouldn't notice any sweat from prior motos. This is a delightful change; not having to put on a wet and cold-feeling helmet throughout a day of riding.

New Shoei VFX-EVO Helmet
Top: California's Zaca Station MX provided a great background while testing the new EVO.
Bottom: The new visor is designed for a "seamless connection" with the shell.
Brian Szumski

The newest update is the M.E.D.S. technology. Motion Energy Distribution System features a dual-layer, multi-density EPS liner that is claimed to reduce rotational acceleration energy to the head in an event of an accident. M.E.D.S. is anchored by a large center column. The inner layer of the dual-layer system is designed to swing during impact and allow three surrounding columns to absorb the energy of an impact. The result of M.E.D.S., according to Shoei, is a significant reduction of rotational forces to the head.

New Shoei VFX-EVO Helmet
Left: The US-spec VFX-EVO is Snell 2015 and DOT approved.
Right: Shoei designed a large eyeport for better peripheral vision and better goggle fit.
Brian Szumski

Another new feature of the VFX-EVO is the EQRS (Emergency Quick Release System) that allows safe and easy helmet removal. The two cheek pads have little red straps on the bottom; pull the red strap for quick and easy cheek pad removal, then safely remove the helmet from a rider’s head in the event of an accident.

New Shoei VFX-EVO Helmet
Left: Shoei says of its shell that it's, "Shoei's strongest, lightest, most elastic shell."
Right: The VFX-EVO is made in Japan.
Brian Szumski
New Shoei VFX-EVO Helmet
Top: The VFX-EVO has four shell sizes.
Left: The VFX-EVO uses multi-density EPS but not as separate layers. According to Shoei, the "precise placement of multi-density EPS material yields a more compact, lightweight design."
Right: The helmet received many updates to ventilation performance. Its 16 intake and exhaust vents provide excellent ventilation.
Brian Szumski

Shoei's helmet pads are fully removable and washable. The EVO also contains a 3D max-dry interior system that absorbs and dissipates sweat two times faster than traditional nylon interiors.