Hatfield-McCoy Expands Trails Just in Time for Summer

LYBURN, WV _ Just in time for the summer riding season, Hatfield-McCoy Trails has added 15 miles of new trails on two of its six systems.

"We've opened 10 miles on the Buffalo Mountain system, including five miles exclusively for motorcycles," said John Fekete, Hatfield-McCoy's deputy executive director. "Buffalo Mountain now has a total of 15 miles of single track trails, more than any other system."

Buffalo Mountain also added five miles of trails for ATVs and UTVs. The 76.4-mile system, located between Williamson, Delbarton and Matewan, is the most historic of the six systems and has three community connectors.

The Pinnacle Creek system, near Pineville, received a new five-mile stretch of "Extreme Difficult" trails, Fekete said. This trail system is known for its breathtaking scenic views and is located less than one hour from world class whitewater rafting. "Extreme Difficult" trails, designated by black and red markers, combine the aspects of the "Most Difficult" trails, along with stipulations barring riders under 18, machines under 200cc's, and two-wheel drive machine. ("Most Difficult" trails can be extremely steep, with larger rocks and more obstacles on the sometimes overgrown paths.)

"Folks shouldn't have any trouble negotiating these new trails," Fekete said. "We have one of the best and easiest trail mapping and signage systems in the country.

"Our maps are easy to understand for just about anyone and our signage - including specifying difficulty level - is such that people can easily get around without getting lost."

Additional trails are scheduled to be opened during the remainder of the year, including a one connecting the Fountain Place area near Logan.

The Hatfield-McCoy Trial System was created by the West Virginia Legislature to generate economic development through tourism in nine southern West Virginia counties. It currently operates six systems with more than 500 miles of trails. Each system is open 365 days a year to ATVs, dirt bikes, select utility vehicles (UTVs), mountain bikes, horses, and hikers. Many of the trail systems also offer community connecting trails that allow visitors to access "ATV-friendly towns" to experience the charm of southern West Virginia.